Kitchen Renovation

It's Time To Talk About The New House

 
Michelle Gage // It's Time To Talk About The New House
Michelle Gage // It's Time To Talk About The New House
Michelle Gage // It's Time To Talk About The New House
Michelle Gage // It's Time To Talk About The New House
Michelle Gage // It's Time To Talk About The New House

I've been putting off writing this post for a while now. Not because I was dreading it, because I have so much to say and barely know where to begin.

In November, we sold our first house (of 3.5 years) and moved into our forever home. We spent the entire time renovating it, room by room. We started by painting the entire place ourselves then moved onto meatier projects, like renovating our kitchen. We truly enjoyed the process of fixing up our first place, but honestly came to the end of the project. We fixed up everything we possibly could, while not pricing ourselves out of the neighborhood we were in. The changes we made were worth it for us to enjoy while we were still living there, but also made for a sound investment when it came time to sell.

Our hunt for our second house started last spring. We weren't looking to move, rather for a place to fix up and flip. This would mean that we'd have two mortgages until the second property sold. We found a gorgeous (but poorly cared for) 4,500 square foot Victorian that was beaming with potential. As we started crunching our numbers, we realized that we were about two years away from being able to take on a second property of this size. We quickly came to the conclusion that, if we did this NOW, we'd need to live in flip and not just have it as a side project. We decided, however, that if we were to move, we were never going to move again. So, our focus shifted. We were still itching to take on another project; we just needed to find one we'd want to live in forever. For many reasons (bad schools, small yard, expensive sewer issues, etc.), The Victorian wasn't it.

I'll skip passed the part where we saw a bunch of beautiful houses that didn't work out for one reason or another - and tell you that we found the one we bought while searching on Zillow late one night. Alex was actually out of town for work and I sent him a link, claiming that I found our forever home. It checked ALL of the boxes - and was under our budget. Considering that our wish list was insanely long (and somewhat unreasonable), we knew this gem was rare. We scheduled a date to see it with our realtor on the following morning and put in an offer right away. With a bit of back and fourth, the home became ours within a few days. As luck would have it, our home sold on the same day - actually, within the same hour. It was really hard to say goodbye to our first place, but we were overflowing with excitement for this next step. 

I'll be sharing more on the project specifics as we get into the nitty gritty. I have every single space designed (in my head) and I'm eager to get those thoughts into posts. At this point, our projects haven't been the most interesting to document. We got a new roof. We converted our heat from oil to natural gas. We've started by crossing off the "needs" items from our list, before diving into the fun projects we just want to tackle. Alex has made plenty of progress on the master bedroom, which I've shown lots on Instagram. Once the renovations are completed in there, he will move onto refinishing the floors. Then, we will bring painters in to paint and wallpaper (lots, duh) the entire place. Our old home, which was 2000 square feet, was a much more manageable amount of wall space for us to cover ourselves. Our new home is 3500 square feet, so we're calling in the troops!

I'm SO SO excited to document more of this space. Stay tuned to follow along as we rip out walls and pull down ceilings! 

 

Design Ideas: Best Bold Backsplashes

 
SOURCE: HGTV.COM
SOURCE: @HUNTERKENIHAN
SOURCE: STUDIO125.CO
Michelle Gage // Design Ideas: Best Bold Backsplashes

Happy Monday! Let's dive into the work week with some kitchen inspiration. 

After completely overhauling our kitchen last spring, I have become absolutely obsessed with ceramic tile. When sourcing options for clients, I can't help but gravitate towards something with a fun shape and color. 

When creating a compelling kitchen design, you want to choose one standout element. In our own kitchen, we chose a scalloped shape in various ocean tones. It's a feature of the space that gets a lot of attention. The bold backsplash is balanced by the white cabinets chosen. 

You can select patterned tile - or create your own by repeating certain colors. Of course, you can also stick to one striking shade and keep it monotone. 

Here are some of my favorite tile sources to get your design journey started:

Mercury Mosaics  - TONS of colors and shapes to choose from

Cle Tile - PERFECTLY printed options

Tabarka Studio - VIBRANT collections, inspired by worldwide travels

Nemo Tile - GREAT glass options

For more kitchen backsplash inspirations, click here and here.

 

Before + After: My Kitchen, After Photos + Sources (and what the heck it costs!)

 
Michelle Gage // Before + After: My Kitchen, After Photos + Sources (and what the heck it costs!)
Michelle Gage // Before + After: My Kitchen, After Photos + Sources (and what the heck it costs!)
Michelle Gage // Before + After: My Kitchen, After Photos + Sources (and what the heck it costs!)
Michelle Gage // Before + After: My Kitchen, After Photos + Sources (and what the heck it costs!)
Michelle Gage // Before + After: My Kitchen, After Photos + Sources (and what the heck it costs!)

Let's jump right into Part Two of My Kitchen Reveal. We tackled this project about a year ago and it's finally time to share the sources we used to complete this design. Let me preface by saying, Alex did ALL of the work himself. While I'd like to say that I was right there with him after work ripping out cabinets and tiling the backsplash - it was all him. The one thing we did hire out was patching a roof leak in our ceiling. Truthfully, that could've been excluded from the budget since it wasn't a part of the design (or plan) - BUT - it's real life and that was something we needed to tackle as responsible homeowners (and ones who didn't want to watch our kitchen renovation get poured on). Same goes for the dumpster. That was a cool couple of hundred bucks that we spent JUST TO THROW OUR GARBAGE AWAY! Home-ownership, while rewarding, is pretty pricey, people.

Here's a snippet of our sources and budget breakdown (ya know, the good stuff):

Cabinets - local company, $9500

Granite Countertops - local company, $7500  

Custom Tiled Backsplash – in partnership with Mercury Mosaics 

Flooring - Lowe's, $550

Sink - Lowe's, $300

Lighting - Wayfair, $600

Hardware - Anthropologie + Lewis Dolan, $650

Refrigerator - Lowe's (Whirlpool), $2000

Oven - Lowe's (Whirlpool), $450

Dishwasher - Lowe's (Whirlpool), $300

Microwave - Lowe's (Whirlpool), $200

Dumpster - local company, $450

Ceiling Repair - local company, $1500

Additionally, we spent about $1000 on miscellaneous tools at Lowe's to get the job done. As you may have guessed, we practically live there. The Lowe's team knew us by name after this renovation.

Keep in mind, your budget breakdown can differ from ours quite a bit. You could spend more money on the appliances and less on the countertops. You might not have a roof leak that requires repair and you may choose to invest in a contractor to manage a labor team. This is just a glimpse at how we did it.

Note that these are all round numbers to give you an idea of what you can expect when renovating your own kitchen. I tried to include all costs - taxes, shipping, warranties - to give you a better idea of the true total. Again, my husband did all of the work himself, so we saved AT LEAST $15k on labor, if not more. We also didn't remove any walls or change the room's layout. Sure, we thought about it, but that costs a sh*t ton of money that we didn't think was worth the investment for this space. When tackling a large and costly renovation, study your neighborhood. We were careful not to price ourselves out of ours. If we spent more than our final cost of $25k, we would start to see less of a return on our investment. Kitchens are one of those spaces where you usually wind up getting the majority of your investment back when you sell. If you are looking to tackle a kitchen renovation, I'd LOVE to hear about it. I hope this post gives you some valuable tools to take with you for a project of your own! 

 

Before + After: My Kitchen, Before + Progress

 
Michelle Gage // Before + After: My Kitchen, Before + Progress

Let me start this post by saying that this renovation was a long time coming. When we first visited this home - as perspective buyers - we were instantly intrigued by this space. It was quite large and obviously hideous. EVERYTHING needed to GO! The floors were dirty and sticky. The appliances appeared to be original to the house. The counter tops were held together with tape. However, the most hated feature in this space had to be the tan rubber baseboard. It was a breeding ground for grime and gunk. 

Kitchens are a costly renovation. Anyone who tells you otherwise is lying. Don't be fooled by house flippers on HGTV who completely transform their spaces for $8,000. That's not real life. In real life, sh*t is expensive. Our cabinets alone cost more than $8,000. I'll dive into "what was spent where" in my next post. My point is that we needed to save up for this renovation. After putting our 20% down on the house, we were feeling a bit strapped for cash. We waited two years to tackle this room.

Michelle Gage // Before + After: My Kitchen, Before + Progress
Michelle Gage // Before + After: My Kitchen, Before + Progress
Michelle Gage // Before + After: My Kitchen, Before + Progress
Michelle Gage // Before + After: My Kitchen, Before + Progress
Michelle Gage // Before + After: My Kitchen, Before + Progress
Michelle Gage // Before + After: My Kitchen, Before + Progress

Alex, my handy husband, tackled this whole project himself - with minimal help. His ability to work his a** off after his 9-5 work allowed us to save a good bit. Labor costs can be pretty close to material costs. With this $25k kitchen project, we probably saved about $15k on labor alone. 

Luckily for us, Alex enjoys this sort of work - though he has since vowed to never tile again. That's the pits! 

To see more progress photos from our renovation, check out #gagekitchenreno.